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Nanaimo Real Estate Blog


May
12
Today, many parents on Vancouver Island are lamenting another rainy day with children home from school enjoying their Pro D day. We know that this election has resulted in a lot of frayed nerves (regardless of which party you voted for), so our McCullough Team wanted to share some fun trivia about real estate. As well, our McCullough Team would like to thank everyone who was able to join us last weekend for our Client Appreciation Movie Party of Guardians of the Galaxy 2. We had a wonderful time and appreciate all of the love and support from our clients. THANK YOU! Feel free to check out the link to watch our movie party: https://www.dropbox.com/s/ss0yrhdxe452g2z/Movie%20Event%20McCullough%20Marketing-Spring%202017.mp4?dl=0
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Apr
28
Recently, I listened to a fascinating Ted Talks segment on the radio. The discussion was about whether or not our English language is to blame for why North Americans save less money on average than other ethnicities such as the Chinese. The English language includes a past, present and future tense in how we speak. The example that the interviewer gave was the concept of rain. We commonly say “it will rain”, “it’s raining” or “it rained” depending on the timeframe of the event. Interestingly, the Chinese language refers to both present and future events in much the same way. In Chinese, one would say (loosely translated) “now it rain” (present), “tomorrow it rain (future) and “yesterday it rain” (past tense).
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Apr
13
Did you know that Faberge eggs are the most expensive jeweled eggs in the world? In 2002, the Faberge “1913 Winter Egg” sold at auction for 9.6 million dollars! Well…many of us will celebrate the Easter festivities tomorrow, and I thought that I would provide you with a current overview of Nanaimo’s real estate market and a few interesting facts about Easter. Did you know that an average US household will spend $131 on Easter each year, totaling $14.7 billion! After Halloween, Easter is the biggest candy consuming holiday with 120 million pounds of candy purchased. For many of us, the news always seems to have some interesting (and weird) stories that come from Florida and Easter is no exception. In 2012, Florida overturned a 45 year-old law preventing the dyeing of animals so as to allow people in Florida the legal right to dye baby chicks at Easter. The dye is either injected into the incubating egg or sprayed on the hatchling (like the photo above). I must confess that when I first read about this, I honestly thought it was a joke as I had never even heard of this practice before.
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Apr
07
Back in the early 1940’s, Las Vegas was a barren chunk of land in the Nevada desert, with little or no development. Bugsy Siegel, one of the Mafia’s most violent and infamous gangsters, dreamt of building a “mecca” hotel that would be so unique in design and decadence that it would be unrivaled. At the time, Las Vegas was not very developed and there were no hotels or buildings that would have been similar to Siegel’s vision. Bugsy was the “go to” guy for getting things taken care of for the mob, and one of its most trusted gangsters. Financially backed by Al Capone, Bugsy’s Vegas dream seemed doomed from the start. He had no background in construction, and was so filled with self-importance, that he thought that he could build the Flamingo, which was to be so much different than the existing landscape. The black and white photo above shows the Flamingo Hotel under construction. Siegel knew very little about construction and the project went over budget (estimated cost $1M but the actual cost was something over $6M). The mob bosses who had financially backed Siegel were so angered by the delays and cost overruns that they had a meeting in Cuba and discussed if they should order a hit on Siegel. He opened the Flamingo in Dec 26, 1946 unfinished. It remained open for two weeks and later shutdown to complete construction. On June 20, 1947 a mob hit-man travelled to Beverly Hills and shot Siegel as he was reading the Los Angeles Times. One of his biggest mistakes was his inability to manage a construction development project, and protect the assets. According to his records, if he had used a developer to oversee the construction of the Flamingo, the losses would not have been as staggering as they became u
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Mar
24
Interesting trends are emerging in real estate and millenials are definitely having an impact. There is a trend towards smaller homes on smaller lots. According to one study, environmentally sensitive home construction is considered important, and 75% of potential buyers want to live in a walk-able community. There is a demand for urban settings and baby boomers are beginning to realize that urban living allows for ease of commute, and amenities are usually within a short walk or drive. It is expected that most suburbs in larger cities will become urbanized within the next 10-15 years.
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Mar
17
Recently, I was shocked to see palatial "shopping mall-sized" homes on blueberry farms and agriculturally zoned properties in Surrey and Richmond (many still under construction). Some of these residences were in excess of 20,000 square feet! The Globe and Mail investigated mega-mansions on farm land in January and discovered the lucrative tax breaks that were being taken advantage of which had been intended to assist those who actually farmed on their property. Metro Vancouver now estimates that 50% of its agricultural land is no longer being farmed. Some of these residences were in excess of 20,000 square feet! Agricultural land in Vancouver has become more desirable for overseas investors as it is not subject to the 15% real estate foreign buyer tax. A few short years ago, it seemed that the average size of a North American house was increasing to almost supersized proportions. Aptly, these new gigantic spec homes were dubbed "McMansions" or mega-mansions and averaged 5,000 or more square feet. As we watched the US foreclosure crisis, these McMansions saw prices plummet at a rate that was simply jaw-dropping.
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Mar
10
It seems as though people are truly fascinated by real estate. I believe that TV channels such as HGTV and others have created an “image” or stereotype of a successful realtor, and showcase marketing techniques guaranteed to sell your palatial home – like renting a Rolls-Royce to park outside a home, to outlandishly themed parties that might include a tiger. In fact, Toronto’s “The Star” newspaper reported that several high-end homes (that are not foreclosures) were being auctioned off, rather than simply being advertised on MLS. Interestingly, it was not until the end of the article that it briefly mentioned that one property was soon to have its second auction as the original deal fell through and failed to complete. Recently, the Province newspaper reported that a company was planning on having an auction sale for Vancouver properties even though they have not had success in BC previously with this style of marketing real estate.
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Mar
03
What happens when war or famine occurs and destroys the plants and land in a country? Without seeds to rebuild the food sources for countries devastated, life cannot exist. I wanted to share with you how a seed vault in the most northern town in the world has been vital to the agricultural survival of a country like Syria. 1300 kilometers beyond the Arctic Circle in Svalbard, Norway, exists the Global Seed Vault which contains the world's largest collection of crop seeds. The purpose of the Seed Vault is to "provide insurance against both incremental and catastrophic loss of crop diversity held in traditional seed banks in the world". It is also referred to as the "Doomsday Vault" by many.
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Feb
24
Real estate is a result of a transformation of our society. The earliest records of real estate date back to the first monarchies whereby royal families shared their wealth to increase their power, by signing away titles and deeds to lands to their powerful friends, allowing the holder to collect rent (I know the original "slum lord" may also have some merit during this time as well) from the peasants living there. However, peasants were able to trade with other kingdoms and eventually, houses (but not the land since that would have been held by the person with the title or deed at the time) were bought and sold and rented among the commoners, rather than the royal class. This also created the concept of "land leased properties" that is still sometimes seen even today.
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Feb
15
As Realtors with a combined 50 years of experience, Myles and I are constantly amazed at the stories clients share with us about past real estate experiences. We thought that we would share with you the 5 most common complaints that buyers and sellers have when it comes to dealing with “the dreaded house pimps”.
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